Cutting tool expert Union Tool leads in the domain of hard milling. Here, the Japanese manufacturer

Cutting tool expert Union Tool leads in the domain of hard milling. Here, the Japanese manufacturer demonstrates the optimal way of milling a solid block of 1.2344 steel, tempered to 54HRC to 100mm from each side. The classic method of machining hard materials or hard milling is an alternative to grinding and electrical discharge machining (EDM). Hard materials are classified in two categories. The first, soft materials that have undergone hardening by a thermal or thermo-chemical treatment and the other is naturally hard materials like carbides, ceramics, minerals and many sintered materials. Materials with a hardness between 35 to 70 HRC are classified as hard. For steel, a minimum carbon content of 0.4% is essential for steel to harden sufficiently after tempering. Union Tool, headquartered in Japan, has a Swiss-based subsidiary, Union Tool Europe, located close to Neuchâtel, a stone throw from Borotec that houses the European technical centre of the Japanese manufacturer. The demonstration workpiece described in this article was machined right here – a solid block of 1.2344 steel (X40CrMoV5-1) tempered to 54HRC to 100mm from each side. Prior to detailing the machining proces...

New Aerospace End Mill Design Results from Tool Standardization Contest : Modern Machine Shop

The latest version of Kennametal’s Harvi tool was developed through efforts aimed at a competition for reducing an aircraft manufacturer’s tooling choices. The fact that the tool makes effective use of six flutes proved key. Other cutters in the testing had five flutes, reducing metal removal rate. Cutting tool maker Kennametal reports it was the winner of a recent competition by a “major U.S.-based aircraft manufacturer” (the company doesn’t wish to be named publicly) aimed at standardizing its solid carbide end mills. According to Kennametal’s manager of solid end milling tools Thilo Mueller, the problem the aircraft manufacturer still faces is this: An expanding number of active machined parts has led to an ever-expanding universe of cutting tools that the manufacturer and its suppliers are using. Historically, manufacturing engineering personnel have had too much freedom—more freedom than necessary—in specifying the tooling for a given part. Limiting the range of choice as much as possible to a standard menu of tools would control costs for the aircraft maker by controlling the scope of tool management. It would also help avoid unexpected delays, because those standard tool ...