Electric fireplaces with the look and warmth of gas or wood

Electric fireplaces have come a long way in replicating the look and warmth of wood or gas, at a fraction of the cost and hassle. A 50-inch wide Fire and Ice model by Amantii. The flame colour can be changed by remote control. Amantii / Ottawa Citizen Will that be crushed glass, pebbles or faux logs? Do you prefer your flames golden-hued or purple? And do you want the heat on or off? These are just a few of the choices available in the latest models of electric fireplaces. All that, and they can be installed almost anywhere. No wonder at least one Ottawa builder is recommending them to new home buyers. “They’re a great way to get the look and feel of a fireplace,” says Jenny Black, manager of the design centre at Cardel Homes. Cardel recently installed an electric fireplace in the basement recreation room of a townhome model at Blackstone in Kanata. From the Napoleon Electric Slimline series, it has a sleek black frame and its high-powered LED lights create a convincing flame pattern. Best of all, it is flush to the wall, with no telltale cord showing. Because electric fireplaces can go almost anywhere, Black says she and her staff at the design centre are suggesting buyers also...

For some people, it’s true: You can go home again. At the Buffalo home of Dr.

For some people, it’s true: You can go home again. At the Buffalo home of Dr. Joseph Capuana, a dentist, and Jan Capuana, a registered nurse, many years have been spent transforming the house that Jan Capuana grew up in – first as a place to raise their own children and now as one to welcome their grandchildren. She is the decorator with a knack for shopping consignment stores and estate sales. He is a do-it-yourselfer with many home-improvement projects under his tool belt. Their residence was featured as a Buffalo News “Home of the Week” online in early October. The News visited recently to interview the couple and photograph the place. The story of the house dates back to 1952 when Jan Capuana’s parents bought it for $17,000, three years before Jan, the youngest of four sisters, was born. Their father, James Murray Conroy, an attorney, died in 1957 at age 40 after a brief illness. The eldest sister was 5. Their mother, Jean M. Conroy, returned to school after her husband’s death, earned a master’s degree in education and taught home economics. The girls’ maternal grandmother moved into the house to help out. Jean Conroy, who had added on a family room and third-floor dormer t...