U.S. plywood producers claim a competing product from Brazil has a high risk of failure in major hurricanes, but consumers can’t tell because the imported wood is falsely certified as structurally sound. In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Fort Lauderdale, the companies allege that since 2016, two American inspection firms and an accreditation agency failed to perform their “quality control functions” when millions of square feet of plywood was imported into the U.S. Much of it arrived through Florida ports, including Broward County’s Port Everglades. “As a result, U.S. residents who live or work in buildings constructed with off-grade Brazilian plywood are exposed to significant risk of serious injury or death, particularly in the event of a hurricane or significant earthquake,” the suit alleges. The plywood is mainly used in the construction of residential and commercial buildings. Homeowners use it to help protect their windows from high winds and storm debris during hurricanes. In a telephone interview, plaintiff attorney Michael Haglund, of Portland, Ore., said Friday that some of the plywood in question was used to help with rebuilding in Puerto Rico after Hurrica...